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Social media behavior can impact divorce proceedings

On Behalf of | Feb 23, 2021 | Divorce |

Those going through a divorce often experience a wide range of emotions. It usually includes optimistic moments when you dream of a new, more fulfilling life. It also often leads to feelings where you feel sadness or hurt that the relationship is over. With so many turning to social media, sharing triumphs and setbacks as well as everything in-between, it might seem to be a good place to share details of the divorce. It is quite the opposite, with an estimated 80% of divorce attorneys turning to social media to find evidence to hold against their client’s soon-to-be-ex-spouse.

What are they looking for?

Common examples of bad or unflattering behavior include:

  • Defriending a spouse: You assume that any venting or sharing of dirty laundry will not make it to their screens if they are unfriended, but a mutual friend may still pass it along.
  • Exhibiting angry behavior towards spouse: Nasty or snarky comments could be interpreted as counterproductive when seeking joint custody or sole custody.
  • Posting photos: Everyone posts photos, but shots of girls’ night out can lead to questions about your ability to parent. Pictures of a new car or expensive trip can lead to lawyers going through the list of assets with a fine-tooth comb or questioning support amounts.
  • Contradictions: You may end up sharing details online that either contradicts what you said under oath or when something happened. This leads to questions about credibility regarding other information shared.

Online silence is golden

Generally, it is best to stay off social media. This avoids the risk of the above mistakes. Of course, sharing with friends can provide a sense of relief and support. Just be mindful of the friend or family member and their willingness to gossip. It may be best to keep unflattering details secret until everything is settled.

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