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Understanding annulment: When you can and can’t annul

| Mar 1, 2019 | Family Law |

Sometimes, you don’t want to go through the challenge of a divorce. In fact, you may dislike your spouse so much that you don’t even want the record of your marriage to exist. That’s what an annulment is for.

Unlike a divorce, annulments make it like the marriage never happened. Annulments aren’t always possible, but they are in some cases.

When can you get an annulment in Colorado?

First, you must determine where you got married. If you were married in Colorado or have lived there for 30 days, then you can file for an annulment if you meet the requirements. The requirements state that you must show that your marriage was not valid in order to annul it. Your marriage may be invalid if you can show that:

  • You were married to someone else at the time of your second marriage
  • You married a sibling or close relative
  • You married against your will

There may be other times when you can seek an annulment as well, so it is a good idea to talk to your attorney about whether a divorce or an annulment is right for you.

In most cases, those who are married and who do not want to continue to be married will need to go through a divorce. A divorce does not have to be a long process, and it can be fairly inexpensive, especially if you’ve been married only a short time. Your attorney can talk to you more about your options if you can’t get an annulment and must go through a divorce.